Course Offerings - Summer 2015

Courses are field-intensive, research-based experiences led by nationally recruited instructors. Field courses can be physically demanding. Participants should be willing to embrace long hours outdoors in sometimes rugged environments, and in all weather conditions.

  • Applications are accepted until courses start.
  • Registration is limited to one course per session.
  • Enrollment is limited to 12. 
  • Community (non-college) students are welcome to enroll. 
  • Financial assistance is available.
 

► Fees and Information (inc. How do I register for a class? What UVA requirements do MLBS courses fulfill?)
 

► Course Application

 


Summer Session I: May 26 - June 12
 

PLANT CONSERVATION AND DIVERSITY: Bioinformatics, Systematics, and Field Techniques, 3 credits, BIOL 4751 / 7751

Zack Murrell, Appalachian State University

The extraordinary diversity of the southern Appalachians will serve as a backdrop to explore the world of plants. We will visit unique and wide-ranging regional mountain habitats to study species assemblages and biodiversity. Management activities of state and federal agencies will be examined. We will critique contemporary views of the most effective conservation units (individual, population, species, family, habitat, etc.) and methods.
 

FIELD HERPETOLOGY, 3 credits, BIOL 4754 / 7754

Colleen Ingram and Laurence Frabotta, University of Virginia

MLBS sits on the divide between the Atlantic and Mississippi drainages of the Appalachian Mountains, a hotspot for salamander biodiversity. We will explore the natural history, taxonomy, distribution, ecology, conservation, and diagnostic characteristics of Eastern North American amphibians and reptiles. We will visit habitats throughout the Station, using a variety of methods to locate, identify, and survey aquatic and terrestrial herpetofauna. 
This course includes handling vertebrate animals (mammals, birds, amphibians, fish). When you complete the Liability Waiver, please make sure you answer "Yes" to the animal handling question.
 

SCIENCE WRITING: Creative Approaches to Biology and Ecology, 3 credits, BIOL 2757 / STS 2500

A short ArtLab Course, May 26 - June 7

Hannah Rogers, University of Virginia

Writing is fundamental to the practice and appreciation of science. We write about biology and nature to explain the world and teach each other. This course trains writers to communicate broadly with specialists and citizens. We will be inspired by the environment at Mountain Lake and other prominent nature and science writers (eg. Wordsworth, Oliver, Cole, Thoreau, McPhee, Berry) and use the experience to produce creative written works. 
This course satisfies the UVA College Second Writing Requirement but does not satisfy laboratory requirement for the Biology major or distributional requirement for the Conservation Concentration.

  



Summer Session II: June 15 - July 10
 

HORMONES AND BEHAVIOR, 3 credits, BIOL 4760 / 7760

Caitlin Gabor, Texas State University
Andrea Aspbury, Texas State University

Hormones alter the development and expression of animal behavior. Behavior in turn changes the effects of hormones. We’ll take an evolutionary approach in exploring the causation and mechanism of hormone-mediated behaviors. We will use endocrinological techniques to examine behavior and hormone variation in wild populations. Students will help design and conduct a class research project with the goal of publishing our results
This course includes handling vertebrate animals (mammals, birds, amphibians, fish). When you complete the Liability Waiver, please make sure you answer "Yes" to the animal handling question. 


CANCELLED - FIELD ENTOMOLOGY, 3 credits, BIOL 4758 / 7758

James Wagner, Transylvania University

Insects account for 95% of all animal species on Earth and are integral to the health of natural and agricultural ecosystems. Students will learn to recognize major orders of insects, know their natural history and role in the environment. We will survey aquatic and terrestrial habitats and make synoptic collections of the great taxonomic diversity of insects in the southern Appalachians. Students will learn proper museum preservation techniques.

 



Summer Session III: July 13 - 31


FIELD METHODS IN WILDLIFE ECOLOGY, 3 credits, BIOL 4759 / 7759

Eric Liebgold, Salisbury University
Tami Ransom, Salisbury University

An introduction to field research methods for measuring and monitoring animals with an emphasis on testing biological and wildlife management hypotheses. We will survey small mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians. Students will learn sampling designs, protocols, and types of studies. Exercises will include surveying, trapping, marking, and measuring animals. Skills learned will be used in hypothesis-driven group projects.
This course includes handling vertebrate animals (mammals, birds, amphibians, fish). When you complete the Liability Waiver, please make sure you answer "Yes" to the animal handling question. 

 

 

► Fees and Information  (inc. How do I register for a class? What UVA requirements do MLBS courses fulfill?)

 

► Course Application